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#467: Winners and Losers

April 29, 2010

Notes from the Manager

Related Strips: #453: March Madness; #460: This Will End Badly, Part Four; #465: Pretty Good Bet; #466: Flattery Will Get You Everywhere

Hello, dear readers! I thought I'd point out a couple things:

1) If you've never noticed the previous Comic Tagger I had (the popular webcomics widget thingy by Ash Young), I've replaced it with a fancy text-based version, which you can see below the strip. It's the "Tag This Comic," etc., etc. thing. Thanks to Andrew Fulton (Hi, Andrew!), who made a fancy new version of it for coding it!

For those of you who don't visit the site every Monday and Thursday like clockwork, what this little thing does is — if you hit "Tag This Comic," it will save what strip you tagged, so that you can come back to it sometime in the future and pick up reading where you left off, not missing a single strip.

If you already used the Comic Tagger; it should function the same as before — with one tiny difference: you can now click "Tag This Comic" on the homepage and it will tag the current comic, not the homepage. If you prefer reading your comics in larger chunks (like me), this is a small but significant improvement. (You can also tag the online Chapter eBook pages, although there are only four of those so far.)

2) Sorry, RSS feed subscribers, but now that Multiplex is my day job, I gotta make some money from the 3,000+ subscribers (the majority of whom do not seem to click through to the site). [EDIT: I was sleepy and forgot to finish writing this section. Oops. Sorry for any confusion I may have caused, too.] SO in the near future I'll be adding an ad to the feed. I don't like ads in feeds anymore than the next guy, but it takes me a long time to make these free comics, y'know? I gotta pay rent somehow.

If it's of any consolation, I got rid of the two smaller Project Wonderful sidebar ads at the site? :)

Okay. Other than that, I'm still plugging away at the last new content for Chapter 5, and it should be available next week. (A strip or two should go up for Kickstarter backers in the near future.)

I'll be visiting the real life Melissa Recar today at the theater she manages (the Randall 15 IMAX in Batavia, Illinois). I'll tell her you said "hi."


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Review: Coherence (2013)

Saturday, October 4, 2014

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Written and directed by James Ward Byrkit.
Starring Emily Foxler, Hugo Armstrong, Nicholas Brendon, Elizabeth Gracen, Lauren Maher, Alex Manugian, Lorene Scafaria, and Maury Sterling.

A new Patreon backer at the $50 level opted out of the usual reward of a plug in the “Become a Multiplex Patron” box (above, on the website), asking instead for me to plug the 2013 indie science fiction filmCoherence (with which he is not affiliated). I was happy to oblige, and so “A fan of Coherence” — a.k.a. The Patron, as I’ll refer to him from here out — is, for the duration of his patronage, among Multiplex‘s supporters. (And, yes, I will review just about any movie a $50 backer asks me to.)

What really got my interest in the film (aside from being asked very nicely to see it) was that The Patron compared it to Shane Carruth’s Primer, one of the best no-budget sci-fi movies ever made. I can definitely see the comparison: both are decidedly low-budget films with small casts and a science-fictiony premise. I feel like seeing the film fairly blind is probably the best, so I won’t summarize the plot beyond the premise of eight friends having a dinner party when a comet passes over and Strange Things Happen, but I don’t think I’m quite as enthusiastic as The Patron.

Unfortunately, the “go in as blind as you can” suggestion means I feel like I need to be pretty vague. Some clunky (and largely unnecessary) exposition gets spat out early on, which tried my patience a bit, but it gets fun as the plot gets rolling. And the plot is definitely the star of the film, not the largely forgettable cast of affluent, Southern California white people or the dialogue, which often feels improvised (in that it neither pushes the story forward nor reveals character, as good dialogue ought to).

Despite some genuinely terrifically creepy or suspenseful moments in the film, a handful of contrived plot points hold it back from being much more than a fun genre flick for me, but I found myself wondering what would happen next — almost up to the very end. A late turn in the film got more of an eye-roll from me than the shock that I think it was supposed register. As always, your mileage may vary, but the film’s merits make it well worth a viewing, particularly for science fiction fans suffering from blockbuster fatigue.

Here’s the trailer! If it piques your interest, please do check it out. It’s available for rent from Amazon Instant Video or for purchase from its official website, among other places. (I never recommend reading YouTube comments, but definitely on’t read the comments if you want to stay away from spoilers.)

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